Edible Monterey Bay

LAST CALL

SUMMER GARDEN SYRUP

and Amber Turpin

Perfect for herbal, fruity cocktails


Here’s a little secret—we never make this syrup the same way twice. Every year the garden is slightly different, and as the seasons shift and dance, each week reveals new peaks of ripeness. The sage blooms and fades, the hyssop comes on slow and steady and the rose geranium sprawls across the path, just so. Wander the garden or the farmers’ market and pick what looks most green, most flowery, most succulent. Herb and fruit pairings are suggested below, but truly, this syrup is a formula for cocktail success no matter the season. Drink it with friends, for the ultimate summer pairing.

3–4 lemons and limes
1 cup sugar
2 cups water
1 small bunch fresh, mixed garden herbs (choose 3–4 of … Read More

THE PRESERVATIONIST

10 EASY WAYS TO STOP WASTING FOOD

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARGAUX GIBBONS

Save money and help save the planet with these thrifty tips


Food waste is a huge problem impacting the environment. In fact, reducing food waste is the third most important change we can make in our everyday lives to lower carbon emissions and reverse global warming, according to a worldwide project called Drawdown, which identifies 100 solutions to rapid environmental change. Its top solution is reducing refrigerants and number two is using more wind turbines to generate electricity—things that aren’t nearly as easy to do at home.

The challenge is intimidating and encouraging at the same time. The report finds that globally nearly one-third of food grown or produced goes to waste. In low-income countries, most of the food waste occurs in production, storage and distribution. … Read More

EDIBLE GUIDES

MEET YOUR MEAT

Paicines Ranch shepherdess Jess Maier runs her Katahdin flock back home after a stay at Calera Vineyards, photo by Alicia Arcidiacono

Pasture-raised protein is plentiful in the Monterey Bay foodshed, if you know where to find it


Do you want some of the healthiest, most sustainable natural protein available? Think pasture-raised meats. In the old days, before factory farms turned the food chain upside down and inside out, farmers let their animals graze naturally on grasses that spring from the earth. Livestock turned green carbohydrates into protein, while recycling the rest to create healthy manure, which was then used to build soil and fertilize other crops. This is the ultimate closed-loop recycling system, aka regenerative agriculture.

Choosing pasture-raised meats avoids the intense resource consumption involved in feedlots, where most beef … Read More

BEHIND THE BOTTLE

GRAPE GOSPEL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULIE CAHILL AND JULES HOLDSWORTH

Prudy Foxx spreads the word on holistic vineyard management throughout the Santa Cruz Mountains


Viticulture consultant Prudy Foxx has a dirty little secret. In fact, it’s all about dirt. While the French term terroir is indelibly more romantic, it all comes down to the soil and all the life that is teeming inside of it. If the soil isn’t healthy, nothing that grows in it can be optimally beneficial for those who consume it. The food chain, wine included, depends on healthy soils.

“In farming, at least what has become regarded as ‘conventional’ farming, it’s all about inputs to maximize yield,” says Foxx. “This is exactly the opposite of the goals of ultra-premium wine production.”

Foxx has a deep love of all things … Read More

Rockfish In Red Chimichurri Sauce

from Rockfish Rebound

Courtesy Joshua Plesh, chef, Wild Fish in Pacific Grove

Wild Fish in Pacific Grove is all about the seafood, and that’s right up Joshua Plesh’s alley. The restaurant’s executive chef is a big fan of groundfish and he’s delighted to hear that more types will be available in the months to come.

With rockfish, sablefish and Petrale sole on the menu, it’s definitely something that Wild Fish is getting behind. The restaurant was one of more than a dozen Monterey Peninsula establishments that participated in the Get Hooked week to promote locally caught seafood.

Plesh says this recipe is easy for home cooks to prepare, and since a whole fish is used, it is also visually stunning for a dinner party.

1½–2 pounds whole rockfish (We use … Read More

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